The following articles are related to the topic of GOD, NATURE OF

Created in the Image of God

The first chapter of Genesis is a literary phenomenon. Though written 3,500 years ago, it still is unblemished in its accuracy and sublimeness of presentation. Some years back, one of the world's foremost archaeologists declared that: "modern cosmogonies show such a disconcerting tendency to be short-lived that it may be doubted whether science has yet caught up with the Biblical ... read more »

The Dangers of Youthful Exuberance

In Paul's first epistle to Timothy, the apostle alludes to his companion's youth (1 Tim. 4:12). The Greek term (neotes) is more elastic than when we moderns speak of youth. Timothy was no longer the youngster that Paul selected at Lystra (Acts 16:1–3). In ancient times, a man was considered a youth until forty. Irenæus (ca. 180 A.D.) said that ... read more »

Why Would a Loving God Send Us to Hell?

The late Bertrand Russell, a renowned British agnostic, wrote a small publication titled, Why I Am Not A Christian. One of the reasons he cited for his unbelief was that Jesus Christ taught that there is an eternal hell for the wicked. Russell could not harmonize Christ's doctrine about hell with the biblical position of a just and benevolent God; ... read more »

Babylon: A Test Case in Prophecy—Part 1

It was the most remarkable community of its day-a San Francisco, New York, or London of the antique world. Herodotus (484-425 B.C.), known as the father of ancient history, once visited the great metropolis. He said that "in magnificence there is no other city that approaches to it" (The Histories I.178). It was Babylon! Babylon's roots reached back almost to ... read more »

Science and Faith: The Budding Romance

"Science Finds God"-so the headline announced in a past issue of Newsweek magazine (Begley 1998, 47ff). The piece began: The achievements of modern science seem to contradict religion and undermine faith. But for a growing number of scientists, the same discoveries offer support for spirituality and hints [sic] of the very nature of God. Earlier, U.S. News & World Report ... read more »

The Haunting Question from the Cross

During the six hours in which he hung upon the cross, the Lord Jesus uttered seven sayings. Surely the most perplexing of these was his plaintive question, "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?" (Matthew 27:46). As one might suspect, the critics appeal to this passage in an attempt to suggest that it highlights a moment of weakness ... read more »

The Power of Speech, for Good or Evil

On the first day of Earth's initial week, at some point following a primary creation, the inspired Genesis record declares: "And God said. . . " (Gen. 1:3). This expression is found no fewer than ten times in Genesis 1. The reader is thus introduced to the power of speech. Later the psalmist would write: "He spoke, and it was ... read more »

Mrs. Job — A Portrait of Defection

Job, the great patriarch of ancient Uz, stands like a beacon light amidst the "tragedy" figures of literary history. The drama of his life is fairly well known. In terms of character, he was a spiritual giant. The inspired record describes him as one who was "perfect [spiritually mature] and upright." He revered God and attempted to abstain from sinful ... read more »

A Prayer of the Afflicted: A Study of Psalm 102

"Like apples of gold in settings of silver is a word spoken in right circumstances" (Proverbs 25:11, NASB). In the circumstance of tragedy, a simple statement spoken in sincerity, "I know how you feel," are words that are like apples of gold in settings of silver. When you say, "I know how you feel," to a friend recently diagnosed with ... read more »

You’ve Heard of the Patience of Job

"Cry louder ... maybe he is in deep thought; maybe he has excused himself; perhaps he is out of town; perchance he is asleep and must be awakened." Accordingly, Elijah taunted the prophets of Baal. They cried from the morning to the middle of the afternoon in a frenzied display of paganism. The inspired narrative concludes, "But there was no ... read more »