The following articles are related to the topic of FASTING

The Divine Pattern of Acceptable Worship — Part 1

Human beings are instinctively worshiping creatures. When the Psalmist declared, "As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God" (42:1), he perhaps expressed a need that is basic to the human soul. As far back as the time of Cicero in the first century B.C., or even earlier, pagan thinkers had observed that ... read more »

The Power of Speech, for Good or Evil

On the first day of Earth's initial week, at some point following a primary creation, the inspired Genesis record declares: "And God said. . . " (Gen. 1:3). This expression is found no fewer than ten times in Genesis 1. The reader is thus introduced to the power of speech. Later the psalmist would write: "He spoke, and it was ... read more »

Sleep: An Evidence of Divine Design

"And Jehovah God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul" (Gen. 2:7). Presently, God said: "It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make a help meet [suitable] for him" ( Gen. 2:18), Subsequently, "Jehovah God caused a deep sleep ... read more »

Mrs. Job — A Portrait of Defection

Job, the great patriarch of ancient Uz, stands like a beacon light amidst the "tragedy" figures of literary history. The drama of his life is fairly well known. In terms of character, he was a spiritual giant. The inspired record describes him as one who was "perfect [spiritually mature] and upright." He revered God and attempted to abstain from sinful ... read more »

Conversions in Acts

There are many disciplines of human learning that are governed by rules. For example, there are mathematics rules, rules that govern grammar, etc. It is not uncommon, though, that rules are structured in technical terms that, practically speaking, are of little value to some students. Hence, a wise teacher learns to illustrate. The "rule" is made more understandable by the ... read more »

John Kitto’s Beautiful Tribute to “Woman”

John Kitto was born in Plymouth, England in 1804 to a family of little means. Schooling was rare in those days for poor folks, and little John had only three years of formal education in four different schools. His gracious grandmother taught him privately, and he learned to read well-which accommodated his insatiable thirst for knowledge. He read everything he ... read more »

The Conversion of Saul of Tarsus

In his popular volume, Paul: A Study in Social and Religious History, first published in 1912, Adolf Deissmann (who did so much to demonstrate the nature of Koine Greek, the language of the New Testament) once said that the true historical investigator must rescue "the paper Paul of our western libraries." He spoke of the "Germanized, dogmatized, modernized, stilted Paul." ... read more »

What Is Worldliness?

The English noun, "world," derives from the Greek term, kosmos (186 times in the New Testament). In classical Greek the word suggested the idea of "order" or that which has been "arranged." This hints of an Orderer, or one who has arranged the harmonious elements of the universe-though this concept entertained by the Greeks was obscure. Balbus, a Stoic writer, ... read more »

When Love Grows Cold: A Profile of the Ephesian Church

Near the end of his second missionary campaign (ca. A.D. 52), Paul, in company with his working companions, Aquila and Priscilla, came to the city of Ephesus. This magnificent metropolis of some two hundred to three hundred thousand souls was the capital of provincial Asia, located in west Asia Minor, just off the eastern shore of the Aegean Sea. Here ... read more »

God and the Nation of Israel

Premillennialism is the notion that Jesus will return to this earth before he commences a one thousand-year reign on David's throne in Jerusalem. Premillennialism, and its theological sister, dispensationalism, argue that in connection with the second coming of Christ, God intends to reestablish a Jewish kingdom in Palestine. The doctrine contends that there is yet a purpose to be served ... read more »