The following articles are related to the topic of CATHOLIC

A Perversion of Biblical Faith

One of the great tragedies of ecclesiastical history is the fact that so many have failed to find a balanced view of human redemption as this concept is set forth in the biblical record. On the one hand there is Roman Catholicism, arrogantly contending that salvation is conferred upon the basis of meritorious acts. The Council of Trent declared that ... read more »

Is the Church a Reed or a Pillar?

Jesus once asked regarding John the Baptizer: "What went ye out into the wilderness to behold? a reed shaken with the wind?" (Matthew 11:7). A reed is a symbol of instability; it pictures that which yields to other forces. On the other hand, Paul described the church as the "pillar and ground of the truth" (1 Timothy 3:15). The imagery ... read more »

Mary’s First Communion

Some seven centuries before the birth of Christ, Isaiah prophesied that a certain "virgin" would conceive and bear a son whose name would be called "Immanuel," an expression which would suggest, "God is with us" (Isaiah 7:14). The name was symbolic, reflecting what the Person would be, not what his proper name would be called (Matthew 1:21). The inspired Matthew ... read more »

The Influence of Modern Trends on the Church

Influence is a powerful thing. Every person both influences and is influenced by others in varying degrees. Jesus stressed the importance of godly influence when he compared his disciples to "salt" (Matt. 5:13), and Paul warned of the power of bad influences when he noted that "evil companionships corrupt good morals" (1 Cor. 15:33 ASV). The Greek word for "companionships" ... read more »

The Role of “Works” in God’s Plan of Redemption

Most Protestants, reacting adversely to the "works system" of Roman Catholicism, have adopted the extreme (and unscriptural) view that works play no role whatever in human salvation. Some allege that salvation is on the basis of "faith alone," while others (e.g., radical Calvinists) argue that God chose the redeemed before the world began, and that redemption, therefore, is entirely unconditional. ... read more »

Paul’s Condemnation of Will-Worship

The church at Colossae was troubled by a heretical movement that seriously compromised the integrity of the Christian gospel. It was a conglomerate mixture of Judaism, asceticism (radical self-abuse), and proto-Gnosticism. For an extended discussion, see Lightfoot (1892, 71-111). One aspect of the heresy depicted by Paul was this: Which things have indeed a show of wisdom in will-worship, and ... read more »

Meet Ted Turner—Thanks, I’d Rather Not!

"Meet Ted Turner," is the title of a major article in the September issue of Reader's Digest. My first impression when I saw that headline, was: "I'd rather not!" - because the man is a disgusting combination of egotism and infidelity. A lot of people grovel at his feet because he is one of America's richest men. He has a ... read more »

Jeane Dixon and the Psychic Hall of Shame

Do you remember Jeane Dixon? She was a world-renowned "psychic," supposedly an advisor to several presidents, the author of eight books, and a syndicated columnist whose horoscope "predictions" appeared in hundreds of newspapers across the nation. Dixon was born January 5, 1918 and died January 25, 1997. Religiously, she was a Roman Catholic, who claimed that God had blessed her ... read more »

The Philosophy of John Calvin

John Calvin was born in 1509 in a small village about fifty miles north of Paris. When he was fourteen years old, he went to Paris to study theology and philosophy. For a while, he turned his attention to pursuing a law degree. But in 1534, he began work on his famous Institutes of the Christian Religion, which he completed ... read more »

May Christians Observe Holidays?

Is it wrong for Christians to celebrate some of the holidays popular in our society-like giving gifts at Christmas time, allowing children to go trick-or-treating at Halloween, or hunting eggs at Easter? In considering this issue, several things should be kept in view. A practice may have originated under certain circumstances but, eventually, have lost that significance-either in whole or ... read more »