The following articles are related to the topic of ATONEMENT

Are Some Sins Greater than Others?

When Jesus was on trial before Pilate, he said: "He who delivers me unto you has the greater sin" (Jn. 19:11). Is one type of sin 'greater' than another? Explain, please. On the night before his crucifixion, Jesus, in company with his disciples (Judas excluded), left the city of Jerusalem and made his way eastward across the brook Kidron to ... read more »

Messianic Previews in the Book of Zechariah

The kingdom of Judah continued to dredge itself into apostasy until a day of calamity was inevitable. In a series of three invasions by the Babylonians (606 B.C., 597 B.C., and 586 B.C.) the nation was devastated. The land was ravaged, Jerusalem was destroyed, and some seventy thousand Hebrews were taken into captivity. Jeremiah had prophetically proclaimed that the captivity ... read more »

Did the Ancient Gentiles Have the Hope of Salvation?

The Bible student is aware of the fact that the law of Moses was given to the nation of Israel. It was intended to regulate the Jews' conduct and to provide a mode of forgiveness (through the Levitical sacrificial system) when they transgressed the law. Where does this leave the Gentiles who lived before the coming of Christ? Were they ... read more »

Have You Considered The Consequences Of Sin?

The theme of "sin" dominates the Bible. There are at least eight different terms in the Hebrew Old Testament reflecting some aspect of sin, e.g., "bad," "wickedness," "iniquity," etc. Some thirteen different words in the New Testament similarly depict various shades of sin, e.g., "evil," "unrighteousness," "transgression," etc. (cf. Pfeiffer, 2003, 1594-95). Sin has left a deadly legacy upon our ... read more »

The Study of Biblical Words

A study of Bible words can, and should, be approached from several angles. In this article, we will consider the following three important concepts: - word etymology - grammatical form - context Etymology Etymology is that branch of "word science" that has to do with the origin and development of words. The investigation of a word's root form can be ... read more »

The Roman Catholic – Lutheran Peace Treaty

The formal beginning of the Protestant Reformation, as generally fixed by historians, was October 31, 1517. On that day, Martin Luther went to the Cathedral in Wittenberg, Germany and nailed a parchment to the door containing ninety-five "theses" (actually, indictments), objecting to various elements of Roman Catholic doctrine. Most of these were directed against the Roman dogma relating to the ... read more »

Adam Clarke & Albert Barnes: Scholars from the Past

Occasionally in these weekly articles I like to depart from the "heavier" subjects and take one of those inviting side-trails that explore interesting facts of history. This week we have a "human interest" piece concerning two renowned Bible commentators. Adam Clarke (1762-1832) Adam Clarke was the most famous commentator the Methodist Church ever produced. As a child he was judged ... read more »

The Value of the Old Testament for Today

In our writings we repeatedly emphasize the divine ideal that men and women exalt the New Testament as the only creed for the people of God in this dispensation of time. The New Testament constitutes the pattern for the establishment of Christianity in any nation upon the planet. These twenty-seven sacred documents embody Heaven's final revelation to humanity. Because of ... read more »

Does the Case of Cornelius Prove the “Sinner’s Prayer” Doctrine?

Does not the case of Cornelius, the Roman soldier (Acts 10), prove that God hears the prayers of those who have not been baptized? The angel told Cornelius, 'your prayer has been heard' (Acts 10:31), and yet the centurion was not baptized until later. Can you explain the apparent conflict between this case and the idea that God does not ... read more »

The Role of “Works” in God’s Plan of Redemption

Most Protestants, reacting adversely to the "works system" of Roman Catholicism, have adopted the extreme (and unscriptural) view that works play no role whatever in human salvation. Some allege that salvation is on the basis of "faith alone," while others (e.g., radical Calvinists) argue that God chose the redeemed before the world began, and that redemption, therefore, is entirely unconditional. ... read more »