The following articles are related to the topic of ARCHAEOLOGY

The Conversion of Saul of Tarsus

In his popular volume, Paul: A Study in Social and Religious History, first published in 1912, Adolf Deissmann (who did so much to demonstrate the nature of Koine Greek, the language of the New Testament) once said that the true historical investigator must rescue "the paper Paul of our western libraries." He spoke of the "Germanized, dogmatized, modernized, stilted Paul." ... read more »

Lessons from the Grand Canyon

The Colorado River is approximately 1,400 miles long. It begins in Wyoming and ultimately spills into the Pacific Ocean at the Gulf of California (Mexico). As it meanders toward its goal, the river passes through one of the most spectacular places on earth, the Grand Canyon. This yawning chasm is 277 miles long, and it is anywhere from four to ... read more »

The English Standard Version Study Bible – A Review

Shortly after its initial appearance, we published an article reviewing The English Standard Version (2001, Crossway Bibles). In that composition we cataloged what we perceived to be some of the strengths and weaknesses of this translation of the Bible. Generally, I commended the ESV, though I remain of the persuasion that the American Standard Version (1901) is still the best ... read more »

MASADA: The Final and Futile Stand

Over the past several decades numerous articles, books, and even a television mini-series have drawn considerable attention back to the ancient Jewish/Roman conflict that culminated at Masada (just west of Israel's Dead Sea) in A.D. 73. Unfortunately not all presentations have been accurate, thus leading to a distorted perception of that startling historical episode. The truth of the matter is ... read more »

When Was the Book of Revelation Written?

Traditionally, the book of Revelation has been dated near the end of the first century, around A.D. 96. Some writers, however, have advanced the preterist (from a Latin word meaning "that which is past") view, contending that the Apocalypse was penned around A.D. 68 or 69, and thus the thrust of the book is supposed to relate to the impending ... read more »

Crushing the Serpent’s Head: The Meaning of Genesis 3:15

Genesis 3:15 is commonly called the "Protevangelium" - a term that essentially signifies the idea of "first gospel proclamation." In the American Standard Translation (1901), the text reads as follows: "and I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed: he shall bruise [crush-NIV] thy head, and thou shalt bruise [strike-NIV] his heel." ... read more »

How Old Is the Earth?

Dr. Hugh Ross, a theologian/scientist, who contends that the earth is billions of years old, has characterized the issue of the age of the earth as "a trivial doctrinal point" (1994, 11). Others allege that the Bible simply does not speak to this matter. [For a refutation of the false ideas advocated by Dr. Ross, see Van Bebber and Taylor ... read more »

The Incredible Accuracy of the Bible: An Argument for Inspiration

Horace (65-8 B.C.), a Latin lyric poet, wrote: "Sometimes even the noble Homer nods" (Ars Poetica I.359). Homer was the blind Greek poet of the eighth century B.C., so well-known for his works, the Iliad and the Odyssey. What Horace suggested was this: as accomplished as Homer was, he sometimes erred with reference to the facts of the incidents he ... read more »

Paul’s Two-Year Roman Imprisonment

It was an amazing series of events that brought Paul to Rome, the great capital city of the empire. One archaeological source suggests that the population of the imperial city in the first century was in excess of four million people, about three times the size of a large, modern city (Unger 1962, 316). When Paul wrote to the saints ... read more »

Herodotus and the Bible

Herodotus was a Greek historian of the fifth century B.C. It is believed that he lived approximately 484-425 B.C. For a number of years he traveled throughout the Persian empire, Egypt, and Scythia observing the culture of these ancient peoples. In his later life, Herodotus lived in Athens, finally settling in Italy where he spent the remainder of his days ... read more »