The following articles are related to the topic of APOSTASY

2 Thessalonians 2:3 — The Falling Away

When Paul penned his first epistle to the Christians in Thessalonica, he had spoken of the Lord's return (1 Thessalonians 4:13ff). Some of these brethren assumed that the Second Coming was imminent and so became inactive. In this letter, the apostle urges them to return to faithfulness, for the Master's return would not occur until "the falling away come first" ... read more »

1 Samuel 10ff – Saul’s Apostasy

The first king of Israel was Saul, the son of Kish, of the tribe of Benjamin. While he started his reign in noble fashion, eventually rebellion invaded his heart and he fell from Heaven's grace. Those who have adopted the Calvinistic theory of "once saved, always saved" have great difficulty with the case of Saul. In order to defend their ... read more »

Jude 1 – The Possibility of Apostasy

While yet within the bliss of Eden, Adam was warned of God that he should not eat of the produce of "the tree of the knowledge of good and evil" - lest he die. In a later conversation with the tempting serpent, Eve repeated this prohibition. Satan disputed the Lord's utterance, alleging that these first human beings would "not die" ... read more »

Apostasy – A Clear and Ever-Present Danger

The sectarian notion that it is impossible for a child of God to so sin as to be lost eternally is widely believed by a host of sincere people. But the idea is fallacious. It was first vocalized in the Garden of Eden by Satan, who lied to Eve by telling her that disobedience to God would not result in ... read more »

King Saul — A Case Study in Apostasy

Saul, son of Kish, Israel's first king, stands as a solemn warning to all who followed thereafter. He was the ruler born of Israel's wishes - that the Hebrews might "be like" the heathen nations nearby (1 Samuel 8:5). In the providence of God, he was appointed their king. Yes, allowed by the Lord, but later removed by the same ... read more »

A History of the Baptism Apostasy

The theme of baptism is one of the simplest and easiest to understand of most any theological subject in the New Testament. How tragic it is, therefore, that there should be so much confusion-indeed such uncommon error-in the community of "Christendom" regarding this important New Testament doctrine. According to The Exhaustive Concordance to the Greek New Testament (Kohlenberger et al. ... read more »

The President, Adultery, and “Baptist Rules”

Denominational doctrines that pervert New Testament teaching have devastating effects in a number of ways. First, they condemn those who teach them. Second, they harm those who believe them. Third, corrupt teaching, paraded under the guise of Christianity, brings the Lord's system into disrepute generally, because the secular world does not discern the difference between the genuine gospel and subtle ... read more »

Numbers 14:11-12 – The Disinheritance of a Rebellious Child

There are some religionists, in the tradition of John Calvin, who argue for the doctrine of the impossibility of apostasy. What these folks believe - and their sincerity is not in question - is this. It is utterly impossible for a child of God to so sin as to fall from grace and thus finally be lost. They ask: "Is ... read more »

John Calvin and Grace

One of the most influential religious figures of the last millennium was John Calvin of Switzerland. Calvin was born in 1509. At the age of fourteen, he went to Paris to study the classics. He was so austere that his fellow students nicknamed him "The Accusative Case." In 1529, he commenced the study of civil law. Presently, though, Calvin became ... read more »

Why Did Paul Say, “Let God Be True...”?

"What does the passage mean, 'let God be found true, but every man a liar' (Romans 3:4)?" In the first two chapters of his letter to the Roman saints, Paul has discussed the spiritual plight of both the Gentiles (chapter 1), and the Jews (chapter 2). Both segments of humanity, he argued, had serious spiritual problems, and were accountable to ... read more »