The following articles are related to the topic of ALTAR

Jeremiah and Lamentations

Jeremiah is one of the more remarkable characters of the Bible. He might be characterized as a prophet of "tears and terror." At one moment, his great heart throbs with anguish over the wickedness of his national kinsmen, and we behold him weeping. If tears could have washed away Judah's sins, surely his would have done so. At another time, ... read more »

Some Contrasts Between the Nature of the Mosaic System and Christianity

Paul once wrote: "But I say that so long as the heir is a child, he differs nothing from a bondservant though he is lord of all; but is under guardians and stewards until the day appointed of the father. So we also, when we were children, were held in bondage under the rudiments of the world" (Gal. 4:1-3). In ... read more »

Paul’s “Mother”

The last chapter of the book of Romans is highly personal. Therein Paul alludes to no fewer than twenty-nine people in Rome, about a third of whom he knew from earlier associations. Amidst this listing is this curious passage. "Salute Rufus the chosen in the Lord, and his mother and mine" (Rom. 16:13). It is widely believed, due to certain ... read more »

The Rescue of Christ — So-Called

Solomon once declared that "of the making of many books there is no end; and much study is a weariness of the flesh" (Eccl. 12:12). Truly, books roll from the presses by the millions - year after year. Not infrequently books reveal that they have been buttressed by "much study" which generates a "weariness of the flesh." Some of them ... read more »

In the Days of His Flesh

It is one of the most touching passages in the entire book of Hebrews. A portion of the verse reads like this: "Who in the days of his flesh, having offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him who was able to save him from death" (Heb. 5:7). The immediate context deals with the qualifications of ... read more »

The Value of Old Testament Study

Several NewTestament passages teach the temporary design of the Old Testament system (the Law of Moses), and the fact that the new covenant of Christ superseded the Old (Col. 2:14; Eph. 2:14-15; Gal. 3:23-25; Rom. 7:1-6; Heb. 6:12; 9:15-17). If the Old Testament has been abrogated, why should a person be concerned with studying it? This is a question pondered ... read more »

The Gospel Writers and Their Quotations from Jesus

Why did the writers of the Gospels sometimes quote Jesus differently? Should not their quotations agree with one another? This troubles me. This is a good question but the alleged problem is not of serious import. Let us consider the following factors. General Principles First, it has long been recognized that in referring to another's audible use of language, or ... read more »

What Is Truth? — A Question for the Ages

It was an engaging encounter. Pontius Pilate was the procurator for the Roman government. Jesus Christ was the Son of God. The two stood eye-to-eye. "Are you the king of the Jews?," inquired the governor. Essentially, the Lord replied, "I am a king, but not in the way you think." Then the Savior affirmed: "To this end have I been ... read more »

A Reflection Upon Three Crosses

Crucifixion was probably the most horrible form of capital punishment ever devised by man. The ancient Persians practiced it (ca. 522 B.C.); for example, when Darius, a Persian ruler, conquered Babylon (the second conquest), he had three thousand leading citizens crucified (Herodotus, The Histories 3.159). Later crucifixion became a mode of Greek execution. Following the destruction of Tyre, Alexander the ... read more »

The Significance of the Day of Pentecost

Acts chapter ten is a very unique portion of the New Testament. It commences by introducing the reader to a splendid citizen of Caesarea, a Roman centurion whose name was Cornelius. Though a Gentile, Cornelius had been attracted to the concept of Israel's one God. Hence, he was devoutly religious and a splendid example of high moral ideals. He was, ... read more »